Skip To Content
Blog News Contact Site Map
Menu

Advocacy Tools

All the information contained in this page is available in PDF and RTF versions at the end.

Briefing Notes

ARCH’s Briefing Notes regarding key proposed amendments.

[Le français suit]

Timelines

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

The Bill does not set dates or timelines for achieving its purpose of a Canada without barriers, nor does it set dates or timelines for implementing key requirements such as making accessibility standards and regulations. 

Why is this concerning?

Timelines are essential to ensure that key accessibility measures are taken. Timelines create goals for the Government of Canada and federal organizations to meet. They are also needed so that progress on improving accessibility can be measured. 

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

  • It must include timelines for developing accessibility standards in employment, the built environment, information and communication technologies, communication, the procurement of goods, services and facilities, the design and delivery of programs and services, and transportation. 
  • It must include timelines for passing these accessibility standards into law.
  • It must include timelines for reviewing and updating accessibility standards in the future. 
  • It must include timelines for establishing the infrastructure necessary to implement the Bill, including the Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO).
  • It must include a period of time for achieving its purpose of a Canada without barriers.

Additional Advocacy Points:

Members of government have said that timelines are not necessary because making Canada accessible is not static – it doesn’t end at a certain date. 

Our response is that setting timelines doesn’t mean that accessibility ends on that date. Accessibility is an ongoing exercise – Canada must continuously adapt to new technologies, advancements in design and strive for ever-improving accessibility. However, setting timelines is important for accountability – it is one way of making sure that key accessibility measures actually happen. We are asking that Bill C-81 be changed to recognize that Canada’s commitment to accessibility is ongoing, and that timelines are important tools for helping us meet accessibility goals. 

We also point out that setting timelines doesn’t mean that the timeline can’t be changed when needed. Bill C-81 already requires that after it becomes law, it will be reviewed and changed as needed. During this review, recommendations for changing timelines can be made as needed.

Requiring Government to Act (Duties)

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 uses language that gives the Government of Canada and federal agencies powers to improve accessibility, but does not require them to use these powers. Bill C-81 uses the permissive language “may” rather than the directive language “shall”. 

Why is this concerning?

Since there is no requirement to actually use these new powers, there is no assurance that the Government of Canada and federal agencies will do so. This means there is no guarantee that Bill C-81 will advance accessibility in Canada.

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

The word “may” must be changed to “shall”. Using the word shall will require the Government of Canada and federal agencies to take action to improve accessibility. In particular: 

  • Bill C-81 must require accessibility standards to be made in employment, the built environment, information and communication technologies, communication, the procurement of goods, services and facilities, the design and delivery of programs and services, and transportation.
  • It must require the Governor in Council to designate a Minister responsible for the legislation.
  • It must require the appointment of a Chief Accessibility Officer.
  • It must require the federal Minister to coordinate accessibility efforts with the provinces and territories. 
  • It must require the Accessibility Commissioner to investigate all complaints that fall within its purview. 
  • It must require the Accessibility Commissioner to make a compliance order every time there are reasonable grounds to believe that an organization is not complying with the Accessible Canada Act
  • It must require the Accessibility Commissioner to publicize information about violations of the Act. Publicity, together with penalties, will create stronger enforcement and deterrence.

Additional Advocacy Points:

We are asking for changes that would impose a duty on the Government of Canada and federal agencies to use the powers given to them by the Accessible Canada Act. Currently, Bill C-81 uses the permissive language “may”, which means that there is no assurance that the law will advance accessibility in Canada. The permissive language “may” needs to be changed to “shall”. This change will significantly strengthen Bill C-81 by making elements that are critical to its success mandatory, not optional. 

Accessibility Plans

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 requires the Government of Canada and federally-regulated organizations to establish accessibility plans. However, the Bill does not require these to be good plans and it does not require an organization to implement its accessibility plan. The Bill does not provide people with disabilities a way to lodge complaints against an organization if it makes no plan or does not implement its plan. 

Why is this concerning?

It is important that government and organizations establish accessibility plans. These plans can be very helpful tools for identifying, removing and preventing barriers to accessibility. However, if there is no requirement to create or implement good plans, then there is no assurance that plans will be effective. There is a real risk that accessibility plans will be weak documents that ignore major barriers and do little to make government and organizations more accessible. 

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

  • It must require accessibility plans to ensure that the organization will be accessible within the same timeline set for Canada (Refer to Briefing Note 1 for more information).
  • It must require accessibility plans to set out what barriers the organization has identified; what steps the organization has and will take to become accessible; a year by year breakdown of these steps; who in the organization is responsible for implementing these steps; and what strategies it will use to prevent new barriers. 
  • It must require accessibility plans to provide details about how they address the principles of Bill C-81.
  • It must allow members of the public to file a complaint with the Accessibility Commissioner if government or an organization fails to make or implement an accessibility plan that meets the above requirements.

Splintering

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue?

Bill C-81 splinters the power to make accessibility standards and regulations and the power to enforce the Bill across numerous federal agencies. The Bill does not designate one central agency to oversee compliance with accessibility requirements and adjudicate accessibility complaints. Instead, enforcement will be done by multiple agencies, including the Accessibility Commissioner, Canadian Radio-television and telecommunications Commission (CRTC), Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA), and the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board.

Why is this concerning?

Multiple agencies adjudicating accessibility complaints may result in uneven or unfair enforcement of the Accessible Canada Act because different agencies may adopt different or contradictory approaches. The experience of many people with disabilities is that the CRTC and CTA are more likely to treat human rights and accessibility as secondary to the technical concerns of industry. Analysis of CTA decisions in accessible transportation cases shows that the CTA does not use a fulsome human rights analysis. Therefore, allowing the CTA and CRTC to deal with accessible Canada Act complaints may result in weak enforcement of accessibility requirements in transportation and telecommunications.

How should Bill C-81 be changed?

  • Bill C-81 must centralize enforcement powers, not splinter them.
  • It must designate the Accessibility Commissioner to deal with all Accessible Canada Act complaints. The CTA and CRTC should not retain powers to deal with accessibility complaints.
  • It must designate one agency to receive all accessibility plans and progress reports.
  • The Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO) is better positioned to develop accessibility standards than other federal agencies.

Additional Advocacy Points:

Members of government have said that it is ok to have multiple agencies dealing with accessibility complaints because the agencies must coordinate their efforts. Members of government have also said they plan to implement the “no wrong door policy”, meaning that if someone files an accessibility complaint at the wrong agency, the agency will send the complaint to the correct place.

Our response is that “no wrong door” may actually be worse for persons with disabilities because it may deprive them of their procedural rights. A person making an accessibility complaint may want the complaint to go to a particular agency because of the agency’s expertise and their record of making decisions that enhance accessibility and human rights principles. “No wrong door” will deprive people from choosing which agency decides their complaint. We are also concerned that “no wrong door” February 6, 2019 may divert human rights and discrimination complaints that are filed at the Canadian Human Rights Commission to other agencies.

Members of government have said that the CTA and CRTC are the best agencies to deal with accessibility complaints in transportation and telecommunications because of their expert knowledge in these areas.

Our response is that when deciding accessibility complaints, it is most important that the decisionmaker has expert knowledge in disability, accessibility and human rights principles. Experiences of persons with disabilities and analysis of CTA cases shows that the CTA and CRTC do not have this expertise. It is more likely that the Accessibility Commissioner will have such expertise. If needed, the Accessibility Commissioner can consult with the CTA or CRTC when dealing with complaints that require some technical knowledge.

Exemptions

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 allows the Minister, Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) and Canadian Radio-television and telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to exempt organizations and government from complying with accessibility requirements such as preparing and publishing accessibility plans, and developing progress reports on accessibility.

In response to advocacy from disability communities, the House of Commons made some amendments to limit the way exemptions can be made. As a result of these amendments, Bill C-81 now states that exemptions can only apply for 3 years. And, any order granting an exemption and reasons for the exemption must be made public.

Why is this concerning?

Even though the changes made by the House of Commons limit the way exemptions can be made, Bill C-81 still allows for exemptions. There is no principled reason why some organizations or government departments should be exempted. Any exemptions will weaken the Accessible Canada Act by sending the message that it is ok for some organizations not to identify, remove and prevent barriers to accessibility. In addition, although reasons for exemptions will be published, Bill C-81 does not allow persons with disabilities to have any input before a decision is made to grant an exemption.

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

  • Bill C-81 must require all federally-regulated organizations and government departments that fall within the scope of the Bill to comply with accessibility requirements. It must not allow the Minister, CRTC or CTA to order exemptions. 
  • If exemptions continue to be allowed, then Bill C-81 must provide a way for persons with disabilities to provide their input. The Minister, CRTC or CTA must consider these views before a decision is made to grant an exemption.

Federal Spending Power

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 does not require the Government of Canada to ensure that federal public money is never spent or used to create or perpetuate barriers to accessibility. 

Why is this concerning?

The Government of Canada spends federal public money on goods, services, infrastructure, loans, grants and transfer payments. This federal spending can be leveraged to promote accessibility across Canada by requiring recipients of federal public money to not perpetuate existing barriers or create new ones. Practically, this would strengthen the potential for the Bill to achieve its purpose of a barrier-free Canada. 

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

  • It must require the Government of Canada, when it spends federal public money, to ensure that the money is not used to create or perpetuate barriers to accessibility. 
  • It must require federal government officials to consider the impact on accessibility when making decisions which involve spending money.

Additional Advocacy Points:

We are asking Senators to support changes to the Bill to uphold the principle that no public money should be spent in a way that will maintain existing barriers or create new ones. This includes the Government of Canada spending, granting, lending or disbursing federal public money to a third party. 

Independence

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Under the Bill, the Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO), the Accessibility Commissioner and other key agencies are not independent from government. Many of these agencies report directly to government. 

Why is this concerning?

The Government of Canada is the largest organization that will have to comply with the Accessible Canada Act. Agencies responsible for overseeing and enforcing the legislation must be independent from government so that they are free to enforce the law unencumbered by the politics of the government of the day. Without independence, it may appear that government is influencing how the legislation is implemented and enforced. This would significantly weaken the Accessible Canada Act.  

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

  • It must be clear that CASDO and the Accessibility Commissioner are independent entities, which both report to Parliament rather than to the Minister.
  • It must allow the Minister to issue only non-binding general directions to CASDO.
  • It must provide for fixed-term appointments of CASDO directors, with removal based on a competence standard.
  • It must require persons with disabilities to be represented on CASDO committees that develop accessibility standards.

Additional Advocacy Points:

We are asking Senators to support amendments to ensure that CASDO, the Accessibility Commissioner, and other key agencies have real operational independence from the Government of Canada. This is an important change necessary to strengthen Bill C-81 and to ensure that it is implemented and enforced regardless of which government holds power. 

Intersectionality and Indigenous Persons

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 does not specifically address barriers experienced by Indigenous persons with disabilities. 

Bill C-81 recognizes that all persons must have the same opportunities regardless of their disabilities or how their disabilities interact with their personal and social characteristics. However, the Bill does not explicitly address intersectionality or the unique experiences of women and girls with disabilities.

Why is this concerning?

It is deeply concerning that Bill C-81 does not address multiple and intersectional barriers experienced by Indigenous persons with disabilities. 

Disability communities are diverse. Disability communities and persons with disabilities want laws and policies to recognize and address this diversity. This is necessary so that laws and policies will have a meaningful impact on the lived experiences of all persons with disabilities. 

In 2017 the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recommended that Canada address multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination in legislation and public policies. Bill C-81 is an opportunity to do so.

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

The following points must be added to Bill C-81 as principles (section 6 of the Bill):

  • Persons with disabilities disproportionately live in conditions of poverty.
  • Persons with disabilities are diverse and experience multiple and intersecting barriers on the basis of disability or multiple disabilities, race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, family status, genetic characteristics, and/or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted or in respect of which a record suspension has been ordered.
  • Women and girls with disabilities experience unique and intersecting barriers.

To ensure these principles are implemented, Bill C-81 must require that:

  • All accessibility standards and regulations made under the Accessible Canada Act advance the purpose and address the principles of the Act.
  • The Government of Canada works with Indigenous communities and First Nations to determine how the Bill will address barriers experienced by these communities, including the recognition of Indigenous Sign Languages.

Additional Advocacy Points:

To ensure that the Accessible Canada Act stays true to the maxim “nothing about us without us”, we are asking Senators to support changes to the Bill that recognize the diverse experiences and identities of persons with disabilities.

Recognition of Sign Languages

How does Bill C-81 currently address this issue? 

Bill C-81 defines barrier broadly, and includes anything attitudinal or based on information or communications that hinders the full and equal participation in society of persons with disabilities and Deaf people. Given this broad definition of barrier and the power under Bill C-81 to develop accessibility standards and regulations, it is highly likely that these standards will address the provision of American Sign Language (ASL), Langue des Signes Québécoise (LSQ) and Deaf interpreters and accessible videos in ASL and LSQ as important tools for access to information.  

However, Bill C-81 does not specifically recognize ASL or LSQ, which are critical for accessibility and civic participation of Deaf people in Canada.  

Why is this concerning?

Deaf culture has its own defining characteristics, which include sign languages, cultural norms, historical traditions and heritage. Deaf persons have long called on the Government of Canada to recognize their unique languages. This recognition is important to ensure that Deaf persons have equal access to information, communication, employment, government services, and other federally-regulated sectors.

In 2017 the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities stated its concern about the lack of official recognition of ASL and LSQ and underscored the need to ensure high quality certification of sign language interpreters. The United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recommended that Canada recognize ASL and LSQ as official languages of Deaf persons.

How should Bill C-81 be changed? 

Bill C-81 must recognize American Sign Language (ASL) and Langue des Signes Québécoise (LSQ) as languages of people who are Deaf in Canada. 

Additional Advocacy Points:

Some have said that it is not necessary to recognize ASL and LSQ in the Accessible Canada Act because human rights laws in Canada already require ASL and LSQ interpreters to be provided as accommodations for Deaf persons.  

We agree that human rights laws require ASL and LSQ interpreters to be provided as accommodations for Deaf persons who need these services for effective communication. Nevertheless, it is still necessary to recognize ASL and LSQ in the Accessible Canada Act. Doing so will acknowledge that ASL and LSQ are not just accommodations, but are also important for cultural  and language reasons. Doing so may also help to ensure that sign language interpreters and accessible videos in ASL and LSQ are provided more readily, thereby removing barriers faced by many Deaf persons. 

Notes d’Information

Les délais

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi ne fixe pas de dates ni d’échéances pour atteindre son objectif d’un Canada sans barrières, ni de dates ou d’échéances pour la mise en œuvre d’exigences clés comme l’établissement de normes et de règlements en matière d’accessibilité.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Les délais sont essentiels pour que les mesures d’accessibilité clés soient prises. Les échéanciers définissent des objectifs à atteindre pour le gouvernement du Canada et les organisations fédérales. Ils sont également nécessaires pour pouvoir mesurer les progrès accomplis en matière d’accessibilité.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié? 

Il doit inclure des échéances pour l’élaboration de normes d’accessibilité dans l’emploi, l’environnement bâti, les technologies de l’information et de la communication, la communication, l’achat de biens, de services et d’installations, la conception et la prestation de programmes et de services et le transport.

Il doit inclure des délais pour l’adoption de ces normes d’accessibilité dans la loi.

Il doit inclure des délais pour l’examen et la mise à jour des normes d’accessibilité dans le futur.

Il doit inclure un calendrier pour la mise en place de l’infrastructure nécessaire à la mise en œuvre du projet de loi, y compris l’Organisation canadienne d’élaboration de normes d’accessibilité (ACSSO).

Il doit inclure une période de temps pour atteindre son objectif d’un Canada sans obstacles

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Les membres du gouvernement ont déclaré que les délais ne sont pas nécessaires, car rendre le Canada accessible n’est pas statique, il ne se termine pas à une certaine date.

Nous répondons que fixer des délais ne signifie pas que l’accessibilité se termine à cette date. L’accessibilité est un exercice permanent – le Canada doit continuellement s’adapter aux nouvelles technologies, aux progrès de la conception et s’efforcer d’améliorer constamment l’accessibilité. Cependant, fixer des délais est important pour la responsabilité – c’est un moyen de s’assurer que les mesures clés relatives à l’accessibilité sont réellement appliquées. Nous demandons que le projet de loi C-81 soit modifié pour tenir compte du fait que l’engagement du Canada en matière d’accessibilité est permanent et que les délais sont des outils importants pour nous aider à atteindre les objectifs en matière d’accessibilité.

Nous soulignons également que la définition de calendriers ne signifie pas que le calendrier ne peut pas être modifié si nécessaire. Le projet de loi C-81 exige déjà qu’après son entrée en vigueur, il sera examiné et modifié au besoin. Au cours de cet examen, des recommandations pour changer les délais peuvent être faites au besoin.

Nécessité d’une action pour améliorer l’accessibilité

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 utilise un langage qui donne au gouvernement du Canada et aux organismes fédéraux le pouvoir d’améliorer l’accessibilité, mais ne l’oblige pas à utiliser ces pouvoirs. Le projet de loi C-81 utilise le libellé «peut» plutôt que le libellé «doit».

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Comme il n’est pas nécessaire d’utiliser réellement ces nouveaux pouvoirs, rien ne garantit que le gouvernement du Canada et les organismes fédéraux le feront. Cela signifie que rien ne garantit que le projet de loi C-81 fera progresser l’accessibilité au Canada.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Le mot «peut» doit être remplacé par «doit». Utiliser le mot obligera le gouvernement du Canada et les organismes fédéraux à prendre des mesures pour améliorer l’accessibilité. En particulier:
  • Le projet de loi C-81 doit imposer des normes d’accessibilité dans les domaines suivants: emploi, environnement bâti, technologies de l’information et des communications, communication, achat de biens, de services et d’installations, conception et prestation de programmes et de services, et transport.
  • Le gouverneur en conseil doit désigner un ministre responsable de la législation.
  • Il doit obligatoirement nommer un responsable de l’accessibilité.
  • Le ministre fédéral doit coordonner ses efforts en matière d’accessibilité avec les provinces et les territoires.
  • Le commissaire à l’accessibilité doit obligatoirement enquêter sur toutes les plaintes qui relèvent de sa compétence.
  • Il doit obliger le commissaire à l’accessibilité à rendre une ordonnance de conformité chaque fois qu’il existe des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’une organisation ne se conforme pas à la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité.
  • Le commissaire à l’accessibilité doit obligatoirement publier des informations sur les violations de la loi. La publicité, accompagnée de sanctions, créera une application de la loi et une dissuasion plus fortes.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Nous demandons des changements qui obligeraient le gouvernement du Canada et les organismes fédéraux à utiliser les pouvoirs que leur confère la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité. À l’heure actuelle, le projet de loi C-81 utilise l’expression «peut», ce qui signifie qu’il n’y a aucune assurance que la loi améliorera l’accessibilité au Canada. La formulation permissive «peut» doit être remplacée par «doit». Ce changement renforcera considérablement le projet de loi C-81 en rendant obligatoires, et non facultatifs, les éléments essentiels à son succès.

Plans d’accessibilité

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème? 

Le projet de loi C-81 oblige le gouvernement du Canada et les organisations sous réglementation fédérale à établir des plans d’accessibilité. Cependant, le projet de loi n’exige pas que ces plans soient bons et il n’exige pas qu’une organisation mette en œuvre son plan d’accessibilité. Le projet de loi ne donne pas aux personnes handicapées un moyen de porter plainte contre une organisation si elle ne fait pas de plan ou ne met pas en œuvre son plan. 

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Il est important que le gouvernement et les organisations établissent des plans d’accessibilité. Ces plans peuvent être des outils très utiles pour identifier, supprimer et prévenir les obstacles à l’accessibilité. Cependant, s’il n’est pas nécessaire de créer ou de mettre en œuvre de bons plans, rien ne garantit que les plans seront efficaces. Il existe un risque réel que les plans d’accessibilité soient des documents faibles qui ignorent les principaux obstacles et ne rendent pas le gouvernement et les organisations plus accessibles.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Des plans d’accessibilité doivent être prévus pour garantir que l’organisation sera accessible dans les mêmes délais que le Canada (voir la note d’information 1 pour plus de détails à ce sujet).
  • Des plans d’accessibilité doivent être définis pour définir les obstacles identifiés par l’organisation; quelles mesures l’organisation a-t-elle et prendra-t-elle pour devenir accessible; une ventilation année par année de ces étapes; qui dans l’organisation est responsable de la mise en œuvre de ces étapes; et quelles stratégies il utilisera pour prévenir de nouveaux obstacles.
  • Il faut que les plans d’accessibilité fournissent des détails sur la manière dont ils appliquent les principes du projet de loi C-81.
  • Il doit permettre aux membres du public de déposer une plainte auprès du commissaire à l’accessibilité si le gouvernement ou une organisation n’élabore pas ou ne met pas en œuvre un plan d’accessibilité répondant aux exigences ci-dessus.

Division des pouvoirs et application

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 divise le pouvoir d’élaborer des normes et des règlements en matière d’accessibilité et de faire appliquer le projet de loi auprès de nombreux organismes fédéraux. Le projet de loi ne désigne pas un seul organisme central chargé de veiller au respect des exigences en matière d’accessibilité et de statuer sur les plaintes en matière d’accessibilité. La mise en application sera plutôt effectuée par plusieurs organismes, dont le commissaire à l’accessibilité, le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC), l’Office des transports du Canada (ATC) et le Conseil de l’emploi et des relations de travail du secteur public fédéral.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Plusieurs organismes statuant sur des plaintes relatives à l’accessibilité peuvent entraîner une application inégale ou injuste de la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité, du fait que différents organismes peuvent adopter des approches différentes ou contradictoires. L’expérience de nombreuses personnes handicapées est que le CRTC et l’OTC sont plus susceptibles de traiter les droits de la personne et l’accessibilité comme une préoccupation secondaire par rapport aux préoccupations techniques de l’industrie. L’analyse des décisions de la CTA dans des affaires de transport accessible montre que la CTA n’utilise pas une analyse exhaustive des droits de la personne. Par conséquent, permettre à l’OTC et au CRTC de traiter les plaintes relatives à la Loi sur l’accessibilité au Canada pourrait nuire à l’application des exigences en matière d’accessibilité dans les transports et les télécommunications.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Le projet de loi C-81 doit centraliser les pouvoirs d’application, et non les dissocier.
  • Il doit désigner le commissaire à l’accessibilité pour traiter toutes les plaintes relatives à La Loi sur l’accessibilité au Canada. L’OTC et le CRTC ne devraient pas conserver le pouvoir de traiter les plaintes relatives à l’accessibilité.
  • Il doit désigner un seul organisme pour recevoir tous les plans d’accessibilité et les rapports d’étape.
  • L’Organisation canadienne d’élaboration de normes d’accessibilité (ACDOPS) est mieux placée que les autres organismes fédéraux pour élaborer des normes d’accessibilité.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Les membres du gouvernement ont déclaré qu’il est acceptable que plusieurs organismes traitent des plaintes relatives à l’accessibilité, car ils doivent coordonner leurs efforts. Les membres du gouvernement ont également annoncé leur intention de mettre en œuvre la «politique du non-accès interdit», ce qui signifie que si une personne dépose une plainte relative à l’accessibilité auprès d’une mauvaise agence, celle-ci enverra la plainte au bon endroit.

Notre réponse est que “pas de mauvaise porte peut en réalité être pire pour les personnes ayant un handicap car cela peut les priver de leurs droits procéduraux. Une personne qui dépose une plainte relative à l’accessibilité peut souhaiter que la plainte soit transmise à une agence particulière en raison de son expertise et de son aptitude à prendre des décisions qui améliorent l’accessibilité et les principes des droits de la personne. «Pas de mauvaise porte» empêchera les gens de choisir quelle agence décidera de leur plainte. Nous sommes également préoccupés par le fait qu ‘«aucune mauvaise porte» pourrait détourner d’autres plaintes en matière de droits de la personne et de discrimination déposées devant la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne.

Les membres du gouvernement ont déclaré que l’OTC et le CRTC étaient les meilleurs organismes pour traiter les plaintes relatives à l’accessibilité dans les transports et les télécommunications en raison de leurs connaissances approfondies dans ces domaines.

Nous répondons que, lors du traitement des plaintes relatives à l’accessibilité, il est primordial que le décideur dispose de connaissances approfondies des principes relatifs aux personnes handicapées, à l’accessibilité et aux droits de la personne. L’expérience des personnes handicapées et l’analyse des cas d’OTC montrent que le CTA et le CRTC n’ont pas cette expertise. Il est plus probable que le commissaire à l’accessibilité ait cette expertise. Au besoin, le commissaire à l’accessibilité peut consulter le CTA ou le CRTC lorsqu’il traite des plaintes nécessitant des connaissances techniques.

Les exemptions

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 permet au ministre, à l’Office des transports du Canada (CTA) et au Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC) d’exempter les organisations et le gouvernement de se conformer aux exigences en matière d’accessibilité, telles que la préparation et la publication de plans d’accessibilité et la préparation de rapports d’étape sur l’accessibilité.

En réponse à la défense des intérêts des communautés de personnes handicapées, la Chambre des communes a apporté des modifications afin de limiter la manière dont les exemptions peuvent être accordées. À la suite de ces modifications, le projet de loi C-81 stipule maintenant que les exemptions ne peuvent s’appliquer que pendant trois ans. De plus, toute ordonnance accordant une exemption et ses motifs doivent être rendus publics.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Même si les modifications apportées par la Chambre des communes limitent la manière dont les exemptions peuvent être accordées, le projet de loi C-81 prévoit toujours des exemptions. Il n’y a aucune raison de principe pour laquelle certaines organisations ou certains ministères devraient être exemptés. Toute exemption affaiblira la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité en faisant comprendre à certaines organisations qu’il est correct de ne pas identifier, supprimer et prévenir les obstacles à l’accessibilité. De plus, bien que les motifs des exemptions soient publiés, le projet de loi C-81 ne permet pas aux personnes handicapées de donner leur avis avant qu’une décision ne soit prise d’accorder une exemption.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Le projet de loi C-81 exige que toutes les organisations et tous les ministères relevant de la compétence fédérale et sous réglementation fédérale se conforment aux exigences en matière d’accessibilité. Il ne doit pas permettre au ministre, au CRTC ou à l’OTC d’ordonner des exemptions.
  • Si les exemptions continuent d’être autorisées, le projet de loi C-81 doit permettre aux personnes handicapées de donner leur avis. Le ministre, le CRTC ou l’OTC doit tenir compte de ces points de vue avant qu’une décision ne soit prise d’accorder une exemption.

Pouvoir fédéral en lien avec les dépenses

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 n’oblige pas le gouvernement du Canada à veiller à ce que les fonds publics fédéraux ne soient jamais dépensés ni utilisés pour créer ou perpétuer des obstacles à l’accessibilité.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Le gouvernement du Canada dépense des fonds publics fédéraux en biens, services, infrastructures, prêts, subventions et paiements de transfert. Ces dépenses fédérales peuvent servir à promouvoir l’accessibilité partout au Canada en obligeant les bénéficiaires de fonds publics fédéraux à ne pas perpétuer les obstacles existants ni à en créer de nouveaux. Dans la pratique, cela renforcerait le potentiel du projet de loi d’atteindre son objectif, à savoir un Canada sans obstacles.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Il doit obliger le gouvernement du Canada, lorsqu’il dépense des fonds publics fédéraux, à s’assurer que ces fonds ne sont pas utilisés pour créer ou perpétuer des obstacles à l’accessibilité.
  • Il doit obliger les représentants du gouvernement fédéral à prendre en compte l’impact sur l’accessibilité lors de la prise de décisions impliquant des dépenses.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Nous demandons aux sénateurs d’appuyer les modifications du projet de loi afin de respecter le principe selon lequel aucun argent public ne devrait être dépensé de manière à maintenir les obstacles existants ou à en créer de nouveaux. Cela comprend les dépenses, l’octroi, le prêt ou le versement de fonds publics fédéraux à un tiers par le gouvernement du Canada.

Indépendance

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

En vertu du projet de loi, l’Organisation canadienne d’élaboration des normes d’accessibilité (ACADO), le commissaire à l’accessibilité et d’autres organismes clés ne sont pas indépendants du gouvernement. Bon nombre de ces agences relèvent directement du gouvernement.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Le gouvernement du Canada est la plus grande organisation qui devra se conformer à la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité. Les agences responsables de la surveillance et de l’application de la législation doivent être indépendantes du gouvernement, de sorte qu’elles soient libres d’appliquer la loi sans être gênées par la politique du gouvernement au pouvoir. Sans indépendance, il peut sembler que le gouvernement influence la manière dont la loi est mise en œuvre et appliquée. Cela affaiblirait considérablement la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

  • Il doit être clair que CASDO et le commissaire à l’accessibilité sont des entités indépendantes, qui relèvent toutes deux du Parlement plutôt que du ministre.
  • Il doit autoriser le ministre à émettre uniquement des instructions générales non contraignantes à CASDO.
  • Il doit prévoir des nominations à durée déterminée des administrateurs de CASDO, avec révocation sur la base d’une norme de compétence.
  • Il doit obliger les personnes handicapées à être représentées dans les comités du CASDO qui élaborent des normes d’accessibilité.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Nous demandons aux sénateurs d’appuyer les modifications pour faire en sorte que CASDO, le commissaire à l’accessibilité et d’autres agences clés jouissent d’une réelle indépendance opérationnelle par rapport au gouvernement du Canada. Il s’agit d’un changement important nécessaire pour renforcer le projet de loi C-81 et veiller à ce qu’il soit mis en œuvre et appliqué indépendamment du gouvernement qui détient le pouvoir.

Reconnaître les personnes handicapées autochtones et identités croisées

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 ne traite pas spécifiquement des obstacles rencontrés par les personnes handicapées autochtones ou les Premières nations.

Le projet de loi C-81 reconnaît que toutes les personnes doivent avoir les mêmes chances indépendamment de leur handicap ou de la manière dont leur handicap interagit avec leurs caractéristiques personnelles et sociales. Cependant, le projet de loi ne traite pas explicitement de l’intersectionnalité ni des expériences uniques des femmes et des filles handicapées.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

Il est profondément préoccupant que le projet de loi C-81 ne traite pas des obstacles multiples et intersectionnels rencontrés par les personnes handicapées autochtones.

Les communautés de personnes ayant un handicap sont diverses. Les communautés de personnes ayant un handicap et les personnes ayant un handicap veulent des lois et des politiques reconnaissant et prenant en compte cette diversité. Cela est nécessaire pour que les lois et les politiques aient un impact significatif sur les expériences vécues par toutes les personnes ayant un handicap.

En 2017, le Comité des Nations Unies sur les droits des personnes handicapées a recommandé que le Canada s’attaque aux formes de discrimination multiples et croisées dans la législation et les politiques publiques. Le projet de loi C-81 est une occasion de le faire.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

Les points suivants doivent être ajoutés au projet de loi C-81 en tant que principes (article 6 du projet de loi):

  • Les personnes ayant un handicap vivent de manière disproportionnée dans des conditions de pauvreté.
  • Les personnes ayant un handicap sont diverses et se heurtent à des obstacles multiples et croisés fondés sur leur handicap, leur race, leur origine nationale ou ethnique, leur couleur, leur religion, leur âge, leur sexe, leur orientation sexuelle, leur identité ou expression de genre, leur état matrimonial, leur statut familial, caractéristiques génétiques et / ou condamnation pour une infraction pour laquelle un pardon a été accordé ou à l’égard de laquelle une suspension du casier a été ordonnée.
  • Les femmes et les filles ayant un handicap se heurtent à des obstacles uniques et croisés.

Pour que ces principes soient mis en œuvre, le projet de loi C-81 doit exiger que:

  • Toutes les normes et tous les règlements relatifs à l’accessibilité adoptés en vertu de la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité font progresser l’objectif et tiennent compte des principes de la Loi.
  • Le gouvernement du Canada collabore avec les communautés autochtones et les Premières nations afin de déterminer la façon dont le projet de loi s’attaquera aux obstacles rencontrés par ces communautés, y compris la reconnaissance des langues des signes autochtones.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Pour veiller à ce que la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité reste conforme à la maxime «rien à notre sujet sans nous», nous demandons aux sénateurs d’appuyer les modifications du projet de loi qui tiennent compte de la diversité des expériences et des identités des personnes ayant un handicap.

Reconnaissance des langues des signes

Comment le projet de loi C-81 résout-il actuellement ce problème?

Le projet de loi C-81 définit l’obstacle au sens large et englobe tout ce qui est fondé sur des attitudes ou encore sur l’information ou la communication qui empêche la participation pleine et égale à la société des personnes ayant un handicap et des personnes atteintes de surdité. Étant donné cette définition large de la notion d’obstacle et le pouvoir conféré par le projet de loi C-81 d’élaborer des normes et des réglementations relatives à l’accessibilité, il est fort probable que ces normes s’appliqueront à la fourniture du langage gestuel américain, de la langue des signes québécoise (LSQ) et des interprètes sourds et des vidéos accessibles en ASL et LSQ comme outils importants d’accès à l’information.

Cependant, le projet de loi C-81 ne reconnaît pas spécifiquement l’ASL ou le LSQ, des éléments essentiels à l’accessibilité et à la participation civique des personnes atteintes de surdité au Canada.

Pourquoi est-ce préoccupant?

La culture liée à la surdité a ses propres caractéristiques qui comprennent la langue des signes, les normes culturelles, les traditions historiques et le patrimoine. Les personnes atteintes de surdité demandent depuis longtemps au gouvernement du Canada de reconnaître leurs langues uniques. Cette reconnaissance est importante pour assurer aux personnes sourdes un accès égal à l’information, aux communications, à l’emploi, aux services gouvernementaux et aux autres secteurs réglementés par le gouvernement fédéral.

En 2017, le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées des Nations Unies s’est déclaré préoccupé par le manque de reconnaissance officielle de l’ASL et du LSQ et a souligné la nécessité de garantir une certification de haute qualité des interprètes en langue des signes. Le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées des Nations Unies a recommandé que le Canada reconnaisse l’ASL et le LSQ comme langues officielles des personnes sourdes.

Comment le projet de loi C-81 devrait-il être modifié?

Le projet de loi C-81 doit reconnaître la langue des signes américaine (ASL) et la langue des signes québécoises (LSQ) comme la langue des personnes sourdes au Canada.

Points de plaidoyer supplémentaires:

Certains ont dit qu’il n’était pas nécessaire de reconnaître l’ASL et la LSQ dans la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité, car la législation canadienne sur les droits de la personne exige déjà que des interprètes d’ASL et de LSQ soient fournis à titre d’adaptation pour les sourds.

Nous convenons que les lois sur les droits de la personne exigent que des interprètes en ASL et en LSQ soient fournis à titre d’adaptation pour les personnes sourdes ayant besoin de ces services pour une communication efficace. Néanmoins, il est toujours nécessaire de reconnaître l’ASL et le LSQ dans la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité. Cela permettra de reconnaître que l’ASL et la LSQ ne sont pas simplement des mesures d’adaptation, mais sont également importantes pour des raisons culturelles et linguistiques. Cela pourrait également aider à garantir que les interprètes en langue des signes et les vidéos accessibles en ASL et à LSQ soient fournis plus facilement, éliminant ainsi les obstacles rencontrés par de nombreuses personnes sourdes.


Template Letter to Senators Re Bill C-81

February 2019

[Le français suit]

[INSERT NAME AND ADDRESS OF RECIPIENT]
[INSERT DATE]

Dear Senator,

We are writing to you on behalf of [INSERT NAME OF ORGANIZATION] regarding Bill C-81, An Act to ensure a barrier-free Canada.

As you may know, 1 in 5 Canadians over the age of 15 have a disability. Many persons with disabilities live in poverty, do not have equal access to the labour market, and are faced with a myriad of other barriers that prevent them from using services and participating in public life.

Bill C-81 proposes to set accessibility standards that the Government of Canada and federal organizations will have to follow. This is a good first step, which we hope will break down some of the barriers we experience. However, Bill C-81 is not strong enough. We need a law that not only strives for full inclusion of persons with disabilities in Canadian society, but also has the tools to achieve it.

Together with 95 other disability organizations across the country, we have signed an Open Letter which sets out 9 key concerns with Bill C-81. This letter was originally sent to the House of Commons Committee that studied Bill C-81. Although that Committee made some amendments to the Bill, the 9 key concerns in our Open Letter remain relevant and important.

We have enclosed a copy of the Open Letter and ask that you support changes to Bill C-81 to address these 9 key concerns.  We believe that these changes are necessary to strengthen Bill C-81 and give it the tools it needs to achieve its purpose of a barrier-free Canada.

[OPTIONAL] Of the 9 Open Letter concerns, we wish to draw your attention in particular to the following:

[SOME GROUPS MAY WISH TO EMPHASIZE 1, 2, 3 OR 4 OUT OF THE 9 OPEN LETTER CONCERNS. YOU MAY WISH TO USE TEXT FROM THE BRIEFING NOTES TO FILL IN THIS PART.]

We thank you for taking the time to consider how you can help to strengthen Bill C-81.  This legislation has the potential to truly improve the day-to-day lives of persons with disabilities in Canada, but it needs some changes in order to fulfill its potential. We hope you will prioritize our perspectives, as persons with disabilities in Canada who will be impacted by Bill C-81.

Lettre-modèle aux Sénateurs concenant le Projet de Loi C-81

Février 2019

[INSÉRER LE NOM ET L’ADRESSE DU DESTINATAIRE]
[INSÉRER LA DATE ]

Monsieur le Sénateur,
Madame la Sénatrice,

Au nom de [INSÉRER LE NOM DE L’ORGANISATION], j’aimerais par la présente vous parler du projet de loi C-81, une Loi visant à faire du Canada un pays exempt d’obstacles.  

Comme vous le savez sans doute, un Canadien sur cinq de plus de 15 ans est en situation de handicap.  De nombreuses personnes handicapées vivent dans la pauvreté, ne bénéficient pas d’une égalité d’accès au marché du travail et sont confrontées à une myriade d’obstacles entravant leur utilisation des services et leur participation à la vie publique.

Le projet de loi C-81 propose un ensemble de normes d’accessibilité que le gouvernement du Canada et les organismes fédéraux devront respecter.  C’est une excellente  première étape qui, nous l’espérons, permettra d’éliminer certains obstacles que nous subissons.  Mais ce projet de loi n’est pas assez rigoureux.  Nous avons besoin d’une loi qui non seulement agira pour la pleine inclusion des personnes en situation de handicap dans la société canadienne mais offrira en plus les outils pour y parvenir.    

De concert avec quatre-vingt quinze (95) organisations du pays, nous avons signé une Lettre ouverte exposant neuf (9) importantes préoccupations à l’égard de  ce projet de loi C-81.  Nous avons envoyé cette lettre au Comité de la Chambre des communes qui a examiné le projet de loi.  Malgré les modifications apportées par le Comité, les neuf (9) préoccupations demeurent toutes aussi pertinentes qu’importantes.   

Nous avons inclus une copie de la Lettre ouverte et nous sollicitons votre appui vis-à-vis de ces neuf changements majeurs.  Car ces modifications s’imposent non seulement pour renforcer le projet de loi C-81 mais encore pour  le doter des outils nécessaires à l’atteinte de son objectif, à savoir faire du Canada un pays exempt d’obstacles. 

[OPTIONNEL] Sur les neuf préoccupations de la Lettre ouverte, vous désirerez peut-être attirer davantage l’attention sur:  [CERTAINS GROUPES VOUDRONT PEUT ÊTRE METTRE L’ACCENT SUR 1, 2, 3 OU 4 DE CES PRÉOCCUPATIONS.  À CETTE FIN, VOUS CHOISIREZ PEUT-ÊTRE UTILISER LE CONTENU DES FICHES D’INFORMATION.]


Template Letter to Senators Re Bill C-81 – Feb 2019

Lettre-modèle aux Sénateurs Bill C-81 – fév 2019



Last Modified: May 24, 2019

Sign Up for ARCH Updates

Don't have an email address?
ARCH News
Updates on ARCH activities and events.
ARCH Blog
Posts that explore topics on disability law, legal practice, and anything in between.
ARCH Alert
Quarterly newsletter with news and information on disability issues and updates on ARCH work.