Skip To Content
Menu

Submission – ARCH’s Recommendations for Strengthening Bill C-81, the Accessible Canada Act (2018)

ARCH’s recommended amendments to ensure that Bill C-81, the Accessible Canada Act, achieves its purpose and potential.

This resource is part of ARCH’s Advocating for an Accessible Canada initiative. For more information about the initiative, go to: www.archdisabilitylaw.ca/initiatives/advocating-for-accessibility-in-canada

PDF and RTF versions of this submission are available at the end of this page.

[Le français suit]

Strengthening Bill C-81

Bill C-81, An Act to ensure a barrier-free Canada, is a significant piece of legislation that has the potential to truly advance accessibility and inclusion of persons with disabilities in Canada. ARCH Disability Law Centre makes the following recommendations for strengthening Bill C-81. These recommended amendments are necessary to ensure that the Bill achieves its purpose and potential.

Our recommendations are grounded in the legal research and analysis that ARCH conducted on Bill C-81, the consultations that informed our final report, and ARCH’s ongoing work with disability organizations and communities in relation to the Bill. To read ARCH’s final report on Bill C-81, go to: www.archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

In addition, these recommendations are informed by ARCH’s expertise in human rights law, international disability rights law, accessibility laws, and the experiences of the communities of persons with disabilities whom we serve. Many of the recommendations made by the Federal Accessibility Legislation Alliance (FALA), the AODA Alliance, other disability organizations and persons with disabilities complement and enhance the recommendations made by ARCH.

1. Bill C-81 must require government and other bodies to implement key elements:

Many sections of the Bill use the permissive language may. The legal effect is to give government and other bodies power to make and enforce accessibility requirements, but not actually require this power to be used. In key provisions, may must be changed to shall, to ensure that accessibility requirements are made and enforced.

  • It is critical to change the word may to shall in section 117. Using shall will ensure that the government will make accessibility standards in the areas identified in section 5, and in additional areas. Without a requirement to make accessibility standards into regulations, there is no assurance that the government will do so and therefore no assurance that the law will advance accessibility in Canada.
  • It is critical to change the word may to shall in section 4, so that the Governor in Council will designate a Minister responsible for the Act.
  • The word may must be changed to shall in section 111(1). This will ensure that the government is required to appoint a Chief Accessibility Officer.
  • The word may must be changed to shall in section 16, to ensure that the federal Minister will coordinate accessibility efforts with the provinces and territories.
  • The word may must be changed to shall in section 95. This change will ensure that the Accessibility Commissioner does investigate all complaints that fall within its purview. There is no justification for the Accessibility Commissioner to decline to investigate if all the criteria described in the Bill are met, since there would be no other legal mechanism available for pursuing the complaint.
  • The word may must be changed to shall in section 75(1). This change will ensure that the Accessibility Commissioner makes a compliance order every time there are reasonable grounds to believe that an organization is not complying with the Act.
  • The word may must be changed to shall in section 93, to require the Accessibility Commissioner to publicize information about violations of the Act. Publicity together with a modest penalty will create a stronger enforcement and deterrence mechanism.

2. Bill C-81 must designate CASDO as the only body to develop accessibility standards:

The Bill gives powers to more than one body to create accessibility requirements in many areas. The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) have powers to enact accessibility standards in certain areas, and the Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO) has powers to create proposed accessibility standards which the federal government may enact into law. This creates a legally complex scheme. It may be difficult for the public to identify which accessibility requirements apply to which organizations. It risks creating inconsistent accessibility requirements. There are significant concerns that the CTA and CRTC lack the necessary expertise in human rights and accessibility to create robust accessibility standards.[1]

Instead, the Bill must be amended to empower CASDO to develop and review all proposed accessibility standards. Those sections of the Bill which provide for the CTA and CRTC to have regulation making powers must be omitted.

This change is necessary to simplify the scheme and enable the public to more readily understand which accessibility requirements apply to which organizations. It will ensure that accessibility standards are created by persons who have knowledge and expertise in disability, accessibility and human rights. This will produce standards that are as robust and progressive as possible. ARCH recognizes the importance of building upon the subject matter expertise that the CTA and CRTC possess in transportation and telecommunications. Therefore, ARCH recommends that the CASDO committee which develops or reviews accessibility standards in relation to transportation must include representatives from the CTA. Likewise, the CASDO committee which develops or reviews accessibility standards in relation to information and communication technologies must include representatives from the CRTC.

3. Bill C-81 must designate the Accessibility Commissioner as the one body to handle compliance with accessibility standards and adjudication of complaints:

The Bill does not designate one central agency to oversee compliance with accessibility requirements and adjudicate accessibility complaints. Instead, enforcement will be done by multiple agencies, including the Accessibility Commissioner, CRTC, CTA, and the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board. This approach will create confusion and additional, unnecessary barriers to access to justice for persons with disabilities. Multiple bodies adjudicating accessibility complaints will likely result in uneven or unfair enforcement of the Act since different bodies may adopt different or contradictory approaches. Experience demonstrates that the CTA and CRTC may be more likely to treat human rights and accessibility as secondary to technical concerns.[2] Should this be borne out, it would result in weak adjudication of transportation and telecommunications complaints.

Instead, ARCH recommends that the Bill be amended to centralize compliance oversight and complaint handling within the Accessibility Commissioner. The Accessibility Commissioner should receive all complaints. The CTA and CRTC should not retain powers to receive or adjudicate accessibility complaints under the Bill.

Further, ARCH recommends that the Bill be amended to eliminate duplication in reporting requirements. Part 10 of the Act requires organizations to submit two sets of accessibility plans, feedback processes and progress reports to different agencies. This siloed approach to reporting could cause confusion for regulated entities and the public, and could impede the adoption of a holistic approach to accessibility issues. It would also be unnecessarily taxing on resources in terms of the time required by industry to prepare multiple documents, and by the CRTC, CTA and Accessibility Commissioner’s staff to review them. Instead, all accessibility reports must be submitted to the Accessibility Commissioner.

4. Bill C-81 must include dates and timelines:

The Bill does not include dates or timelines for achieving its purpose of a Canada without barriers, nor does it include dates or timelines for implementing key requirements such as making accessibility standards. Timelines are essential for ensuring that the Bill will advance accessibility in Canada.

  • Section 5 must include a specific year or period of time by which a Canada without barriers will be achieved.
  • Section 11(1) must include the same year or period of time as section 5.
  • The Bill must include timelines by which CASDO must develop accessibility standards in employment, the built environment, information and communication technologies, the procurement of goods and services, the delivery of programs and services, and transportation.
  • The Bill must include timelines by which CASDO must review and revise accessibility standards.
  • Section 117 must be amended to include a timeline within which the Federal Government will enact accessibility standards into regulations.

5. Bill C-81 must ensure that CASDO, the Accessibility Commissioner and other key positions are sufficiently independent:

Independence is critical to allow CASDO and the Accessibility Commissioner to carry out their mandates for developing and revising accessibility standards or overseeing enforcement and compliance with the Bill unencumbered by the political and policy priorities of the government of the day. Without sufficient independence, key accountability measures will be seen as weak.

  • Section 17(2) must be amended to state that CASDO is an organization independent or at arms-length from government.
  • ARCH adopts the recommendation of the AODA Alliance that section 21(1) must be amended to allow the Minister to issue only non-binding general directions to CASDO.
  • The Bill must be amended to provide for fixed-term appointments of CASDO directors, with removal based on a good behaviour or competence standard.
  • Section 36 must be amended to provide that CASDO report directly to Parliament, rather than to the Minister.
  • ARCH adopts the AODA Alliance’s recommendations in relation to measures that must be taken to strengthen representation of persons with disabilities on CASDO.[3]
  • Section 39 must be amended to provide that the Accessibility Commissioner will report to Parliament, not to the Minister. This would provide the Commissioner with a greater degree of independence.

6. Bill C-81 must not allow organizations to be exempted from complying with accessibility requirements:

The Bill allows for regulated entities to be exempted from complying with accessibility requirements. There is no principled reason why some organizations should be exempted. Any exemptions will weaken the overall purpose of the Act.

  • Sections 46(1), 55(1), 64(1) and 68(1) must be omitted from the Bill. These sections permit the Minister, the CRTC or the CTA to exempt organizations from complying with requirements to prepare and publish accessibility plans, create feedback processes and develop progress reports.
  • Section 117(1)(l) must be omitted from the Bill. This section permits the government to exempt certain organizations or undertakings from producing and publishing accessibility plans, feedback processes and progress reports.
  • Section 117(2) must be amended to require the government to provide reasons for proposing the creation of classes of entities, provide information on whether the class will be exempted from any accessibility requirements, make this information public, provide an opportunity for feedback, and consider this feedback before creating the class. If certain classes of organizations are exempt from accessibility requirements, this exemption should be subject to future review to ensure that it is still needed.

7. Bill C-81 must ensure that accessibility requirements do not diminish existing legal rights of persons with disabilities:

  • The preamble and purpose sections of Bill C-81 must clarify that nothing in the Act lessens the existing human rights obligations of federally-regulated entities under the Canadian Human Rights Act, and that where a conflict arises between the Act and another law, the law that provides the greatest accessibility for persons with disabilities will apply.
  • Section 117 must state that nothing in the regulations can reduce or minimize the right to be free from discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Charter.
  • Bill C-81 must be amended to require the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) to apply the same legal test for discrimination as the Canadian Human Rights Commission and Tribunal. This change is necessary because Bill C-81 will make the CTA the primary forum for adjudicating accessible transportation complaints pursuant to the Canada Transportation Act.Without this amendment, it is likely that many accessible transportation complaints at the CTA will fail or not get the full benefit of a robust human rights legal analysis.[4]
  • Bill C-81 must be amended to clarify that compliance with regulations under the Canada Transportation Act does not necessarily mean that an “undue barrier” or discriminatory barrier does not exist. Without this amendment, it is likely that transportation organizations who have complied with accessibility standards will not also be required to comply with their legal obligations under the Canadian Human Rights Act.[5]

8. Bill C-81 must address barriers created by poverty and intersectional discrimination:

The Bill must do more to address the multiple and intersectional barriers experienced by persons with disabilities in relation to their identities, and by persons with disabilities who live in poverty or on low incomes.

  • Section 6 must be amended to include the following additional principles:
    • Persons with disabilities disproportionately live in conditions of poverty.
    • Women and girls with disabilities experience unique and intersecting barriers to accessibility, which must be recognized and addressed.
    • Persons with disabilities are diverse and experience multiple and intersecting barriers, as a result of discrimination on the basis of disability or multiple disabilities, race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, family status, genetic characteristics, and/or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted or in respect of which a record suspension has been ordered. Multiple and intersectional barriers must be recognized and addressed.
    • Barrier identification, removal and prevention must be done in accordance with principles of inclusive design and universal design.
    • In accordance with Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, persons with disabilities enjoy legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life.
  • Part 4 must include an additional provision requiring accessibility plans to relate to the purpose of the Act and to be prepared and implemented in accordance with the principles of the Act. Plans should address how they will contribute to achieving a Canada without barriers by the date specified in the Act. These changes would strengthen the effectiveness of accessibility plans, and help to ensure that barrier identification, prevention and removal addresses issues of intersectionality and poverty.
  • Similarly, section 117 must be amended to require that regulations advance the purpose and further the principles of the Act.
  • Part 6 must provide that the Accessibility Commissioner will receive anti-racism, anti-oppression and cultural competency training to ensure that the complaint process does not perpetuate systemic discrimination experienced by ethno-racial persons with disabilities or Indigenous persons with disabilities.
  • Part 6 must be amended to provide for a participant funding program, which would address barriers to access to justice experienced by persons with disabilities who live in poverty or are on low incomes.
  • Section 5 must use language of design and delivery of programs and services. This change is necessary to avoid the foreseeable problem of the substantive objectives or parameters of a program being put in place before thinking about disability, accessibility and inclusion. Accessibility and inclusion must not be after-the-fact considerations.
  • ARCH adopts the recommendation made by FALA that the Preamble must be amended by changing Canadians to persons in Canada.[6] This change is necessary to help to ensure that everyone in Canada, regardless of their citizenship status or identification with Canada, benefits from accessibility requirements under the Act.

9. ARCH supports the recommendation made by FALA, Canadian Association of the Deaf and others that Bill C-81 must recognize ASL and lsq as official languages of people who are Deaf in Canada.

10. Bill C-81 must address barriers experienced by Indigenous and First Nations persons with disabilities:

The Government of Canada must work with Indigenous communities and First Nations to determine what amendments are required to ensure that the Bill addresses barriers experienced by these communities.

11. ARCH agrees with FALA that it is essential to identify, remove and prevent barriers in relation to communication. The Bill must be clarified to ensure that communication is addressed within each of the areas enumerated in section 5, in a manner that complements existing legal obligations to accommodate persons with disabilities.

12. Bill C-81 must include stronger provisions for reviewing the Accessible Canada Act and monitoring the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:

  • Section 131 must be amended to require that the committee conduct its first review 5 years after the date on which the Act is proclaimed into law. This change will prevent the review from being delayed if the regulations are not promptly passed.
  • Section 132 must be amended to require the first independent review of the Act to be held in 2025 and every four years thereafter. This will coincide with Canada’s reporting obligations under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).
  • Section 149 must ensure that persons with disabilities participate meaningfully in monitoring the implementation of the CRPD. Such participation is required under article 33(3) of the CRPD. Section 149 must be amended to require the Canadian Human Rights Commission to monitor in accordance with articles 33(2) and 33(3) of the CRPD. Sufficient resources must be provided to the Commission and disability communities to support them to fulfill these roles.

13. Bill C-81 must include stronger definitions of disability and barrier:

  • Section 2 must be amended by adding disability includes but is not limited to at the beginning of the definition of disability, and by adding whether the disability is evident or not to the definition of disability. These changes would make the definition of disability broader and more inclusive.
  • Section 2 should be amended by adding the word law to the definition of barrier. This change would help to ensure that barriers created by federal laws are identified, removed and prevented.

14. Bill C-81 must require the Minister to progressively realize a barrier-free Canada:

Sections 11(2) – 16 must be amended to include additional duties to ensure that the Minister responsible for the Act implements progressive realization of a barrier-free Canada. These additional duties include:

  • the Minister shall establish benchmarks for progressively realizing a Canada without barriers;
  • the Minister shall establish progressive timelines for meeting these benchmarks;
  • the Minister shall regularly assess progress towards meeting these benchmarks. In this respect section 15 should be changed to: Subject to the Statistics Act, the Minister shall collect, analyse, interpret, publish and distribute information in relation to matters relating to accessibility.  An additional subsection must be added requiring the Minister to collect, analyse, interpret, publish and distribute information regarding progress being made towards meeting established benchmarks within the time specified in the Act.

15. Bill C-81 must ensure that the process for making complaints to the Accessibility Commissioner is fair:

  • Section 95(e) must be amended to make it clear that the one year limitation period to file an accessibility complaint begins from the time the complainant became aware of the act or omission which caused them to suffer a loss. This change will ensure that people are not prevented from filing an accessibility complaint because they were not aware of the organization’s failure to comply with the Act occurred more than one year ago.
  • Section 103 must be amended to require that the person who reviews a decision not to investigate or to discontinue an investigation of a complaint is not the same person who made the original decision.
  • Part 6 must include a section that provides that complainants who request a review of the Accessibility Commissioner’s decisions will have an opportunity to make submissions in a manner and form that is accessible to them.

[1] For more detailed legal and practice analysis on this point, see pages 37-38, 41-42, 47 of ARCH’s final report, available at: http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

[2] For more detailed legal and practice analysis on this point, see pages 41-42, 47, 57-62 of ARCH’s final report, available at: http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

[3] The AODA Alliance’s recommendations include:

Section 32 of the bill should be amended to require compensation and reasonable expenses for members of CASDO advisory committees, and particularly, for those from the disability community or non-profit and voluntary sectors.

Section 32(1) of the bill should be amended to require the CASDO CEO to consult with the CASDO board when selecting membership of an advisory committee to assist CASDO with developing accessibility standards.

Part 2 of the bill should be amended to:

Require CASDO to consult the public, including people with disabilities, along specified time lines, on which accessibility standards it should create.

Require CASDO to make public, along specified and regular time lines, the accessibility standards it has decided to start to develop, and the work in progress on these standards.

Require CASDO to promptly make public the minutes of CASDO advisory committees and of the CASDO board, which should be required to be kept. These minutes should identify any draft recommendations under consideration, so the public knows exactly what CASDO is considering.

Require CASDO to consult the public, including the disability community, on the contents of accessibility standards it is considering adopting.

More detail on these points is in the AODA Alliance’s Brief to Parliament on Bill C-81, September 27, 2018, available at: https://www.aodaalliance.org/whats-new/please-tell-the-federal-government-if-you-support-the-aoda-alliances-finalized-brief-to-the-parliament-of-canada-that-requests-amendments-to-bill-c-81-the-proposed-accessible-canada-act/

[4] For more detailed legal and practice analysis on this point, see pages 41-42, 47, 57-62 of ARCH’s final report, available at: http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

[5] For more detailed legal and practice analysis on this point, see pages 41-42, 47, 57-62 of ARCH’s final report, available at: http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

[6] More details on this point are available in the Federal Accessibility Legilsation Alliance (FALA)’s Recommendations for Improving Bill C-81, the Proposed Accessible Canada Act, October 2018


Recommandations pour Modifications au Projet de Loi C-81, la Loi visant à faire du Canada un pays exempt d’obstacles

Renforcer le Projet de loi C-81

Le Projet de loi C-81, Loi visant à faire du Canada un pays exempt d’obstacles, est une importante mesure législative, pouvant réellement faire progresser l’accessibilité et l’inclusion des personnes en situation de handicap au Canada.  Pour renforcer ce projet de loi C-81, ARCH Disability Law Centre propose les recommandations suivantes, modifications qui s’imposent pour que la loi réalise son plein potentiel et ses objectifs.

Nos recommandations sont fondées sur la recherche et l’analyse juridiques que nous avons effectuée sur le projet de loi C-81, sur les consultations qui ont instruit notre rapport final et sur les travaux soutenus sur le projet de loi C-81 que ARCH a réalisés avec la collectivité et les organisations de personnes en situation de handicap.  Pour lire le rapport final de ARCH sur le projet de loi C-81, consultez le site: www.archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report.

Ces recommandations sont également étayées par l’expertise de ARCH en droits de la personne, en lois internationales de droits internationaux visant les droits des personnes handicapées, en lois sur l’accessibilité ainsi que par l’expérience acquise auprès des collectivités de personnes handicapées desservies. Plusieurs recommandations de  l’ALFA, de l’AODA, d’organisations de personnes handicapées et de citoyens en situation de handicap complètent et bonifient celles de ARCH.

1. Le projet de loi C-81 doit exiger que le gouvernement et autres entités mettent en œuvre les dispositions clés :  

Le verbe permissif « peut » est utilisé dans de nombreux paragraphes de la loi.  Juridiquement, cela implique que le gouvernement et autres entités ont le pouvoir de produire et d’appliquer des exigences en matière d’accessibilité, sans toutefois être obligés d’exercer ce pouvoir.  Par conséquent, afin de de garantir l’élaboration et l’application des exigences en matière d’accessibilité, le verbe « peut » doit être remplacé par le verbe « doit » dans les dispositions clés.

  • Il faut absolument remplacer le verbe « peut » par le verbe « doit » à l’article 117. Ainsi, le gouvernement sera tenu d’établir des normes d’accessibilité dans   les secteurs identifiés au paragraphe 5 ainsi que dans d’autres secteurs.  Sans l’obligation de transformer les normes d’accessibilité en règlements, rien ne nous garantit que le gouvernement prendra les mesures appropriées et, par conséquent, que la loi fera progresser l’accessibilité au Canada.
  • Il faut absolument remplacer le verbe « peut » par le verbe «» à  l’article 4.  Ainsi, le gouvernement sera tenu de nommer un ministre responsable de la Loi. 
  • Le verbe «  peut »   doit être remplacé par le verbe “doit” au paragraphe 111(1). Ainsi, le gouvernement sera tenu de nommer un dirigeant principal de l’accessibilité.
  • Le verbe « peut »   doit être remplacé par le verbe “doit” à l’article 16 afin que le ministre soit tenu de coordonner les efforts des provinces et des territoires en matière d’accessibilité.
  • Le verbe « peut »   doit être remplacé par le verbe « doit » à l’article 95.  Cette modification permettra de s’assurer que le commissaire à l’accessibilité enquête sur toutes les plaintes relevant de sa compétence. Rien ne justifie le refus d’enquêter sur une plainte si tous les critères prévus dans le projet de loi sont respectés car aucun autre mécanisme légal ne sera disponible à cette fin.
  • Le verbe « peut »   doit être remplacé par le verbe « doit » au paragraphe 75 (1). Cela permettra ainsi de s’assurer que le commissaire à l’accessibilité émettra des ordres de conformité chaque fois qu’il aura des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’une organisation ne se conforme pas à la Loi. 
  • Le verbe « peut »   doit être remplacé par le verbe « doit » à l’article 93 afin que le commissaire à l’accessibilité publie des informations sur des infractions à la Loi. Une publication doublée d’une modeste sanction renforcera le mécanisme d’exécution et de dissuasion.

2. Le projet de loi C-81 doit désigner l’OCENA comme seul organisme d’élaboration des normes d’accessibilité:

Le projet de loi confère à plusieurs entités le pouvoir de créer des normes d’accessibilité dans de nombreux secteurs. L’Office des transports du Canada (OTC) et le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC) ont le pouvoir de promulguer des normes d’accessibilité.   L’Organisation canadienne d’élaboration de normes d’accessibilité (OCENA) a le pouvoir d’élaborer des normes d’accessibilité que le gouvernement peut édicter en lois.  Ce qui créée un système juridiquement complexe.  Il sera peut-être difficile pour la population d’associer   les exigences d’accessibilité aux organisations appropriées.  Il peut en résulter des exigences contradictoires.  De plus, le manque d’expertise de l’OTC et du CRTC en accessibilité et en droits de la personne risque d’altérer la création de rigoureuses normes d’accessibilité. Et c’est très préoccupant.[1]

Le projet de loi devrait au contraire être modifié pour habiliter l’OCENA à élaborer et réviser toutes les normes d’accessibilité proposées.  Ces paragraphes du projet conférant des pouvoirs de réglementation à l’OTC et au CRTC devraient être supprimés.

Ce changement s’impose pour pouvoir simplifier le système et permettre à la population de comprendre plus facilement à quelle organisation s’applique tel type d’exigence. De ce fait, les normes d’accessibilité seront créées par des personnes spécialisées en et connaissant les situations de handicap.  Les normes seront tout aussi rigoureuses que progressives que possible.  ARCH reconnaît l’importance de l’expertise que l’OTC et le CRTC possèdent chacun dans leur domaine, à savoir en transport et en télécommunications. Par conséquent, ARCH recommande que des représentants de l’OTC et des représentants du CRTC siègent au Comité de l’OCENA qui élabore et révise les normes portant respectivement sur les transports et sur les technologies d’information et de télécommunications.  

3. Le projet de loi C-81 doit désigner   le commissaire à l’accessibilité comme seul responsable de la conformité aux normes d’accessibilité et du règlement des plaintes:

Le projet de loi ne confie pas la surveillance de la conformité aux exigences d’accessibilité ainsi que le règlement des plaintes à un seul organisme.  Au contraire, il en désigne plusieurs, notamment le commissaire à l’accessibilité, le CRTC, l’OTC et la Commission des relations de travail et de l’emploi dans le secteur public fédéral.  Résultat :  confusion et autres obstacles inutiles en ce qui a trait à   l’accès des personnes handicapées à la justice.  Confier le traitement des plaintes d’accessibilité à de multiples organismes engendrera probablement une application inégale ou injuste de la Loi car ces entités risquent d’adopter des approches différentes voire contradictoires.  Il est empiriquement démontré que pour l’OTC et le CRTC, les problèmes techniques sont prioritaires, Viennent ensuite les questions de droits de la personne et d’accessibilité. [2]  Si cela se confirme, le règlement des plaintes dans les transports et les télécommunications sera faible. 

ARCH recommande plutôt que le projet de loi soit modifié afin que la surveillance de la conformité et le traitement des plaintes soient centralisés chez le commissaire à l’accessibilité.   Toutes les plaints devraient être envoyées au commissaire à l’accessibilité.  L’OTC et le CRTC ne devraient pas conserver le pouvoir d’accueillir et de statuer sur les plaintes d’accessibilité en vertu de la loi.

ARCH recommande en outre que le projet de loi soit modifié pour éliminer les dédoublements quant aux exigences en matière de rapports.   En vertu de la Partie 10 de la Loi, les organisations doivent soumettre deux jeux de plans sur l’accessibilité, des processus de rétroaction et des rapports d’étapes à différents organismes. Ce cloisonnement pourrait être source de confusion pour les entités réglementées et la population.  Il pourrait en outre entraver l’adoption d’une approche holistique vis-à-vis des questions d’accessibilité.  Il taxerait inutilement les ressources en termes de temps requis par l’industrie pour préparer les multiples documents et par le CRTC, l’OTC et le commissaire à l’accessibilité pour les examiner.   En fait, tous les rapports sur l’accessibilité devraient être soumis au commissaire à l’accessibilité.

4. Le projet de loi C881 doit inclure des dates et des échéanciers:

Le projet de loi ne prévoit ni dates ni échéanciers non seulement pour atteindre son objectif, à savoir un Canada exempt d’obstacles, mais encore pour la mise en vigueur des principales exigences, notamment la production de normes d’accessibilité.  Or les échéances sont indispensables pour que le projet de loi fasse progresser l’accessibilité au Canada.

  • L’article 5 doit inclure une année précise ou un échéancier pour construire un Canada sans obstacles.
  • Le paragraphe 11(1) doit inclure la même année ou le même échéancier que l’article 5.
  • Le projet de loi doit prévoir pour l’OCENA, des échéances d’élaboration de normes d’accessibilité dans les transports, les technologies d’information et de communications, l’environnement bâti, l’approvisionnement en biens et services, la prestation de programmes et de services et les transports.
  • Le projet de loi doit prévoir des échéances pour l’examen et la révision, par l’OCENA, des normes d’accessibilité.
  • L’article 117 doit être modifié afin d’Inclure un échéancier pour que le gouvernement fédéral édicte les normes d’accessibilité en règlements.

5. Le projet de loi C-81 doit garantir une indépendance suffisante de l’OCENA, du commissaire à l’accessibilité et des autres postes clés:

Cette indépendance est cruciale pour que l’OCENA et le commissaire à l’accessibilité puissent accomplir leur mission d’élaborer et réviser les normes d’accessibilité ou s’assurer que la mise en œuvre de la Loi et la conformité à la Loi ne soient entravées par des priorités politiques et stratégiques du gouvernement du moment. Sans indépendance suffisante, les principales mesures d’imputabilité seront jugées faibles.

  • Le paragraphe 17(2) doit être modifié pour stipuler que l’OCENA est une organisation indépendante ou indépendante du gouvernement.
  • ARCH adopte la recommandation de l’AODA Alliance  de modifier le paragraphe 21(1) afin que le ministre puisse donner à l’OCENA des instructions générales à caractère non obligatoire.
  • Que le projet de loi soit modifié afin de nommer les directeurs de l’OCENA pour une durée définie avec révocation basée sur l’inamovibilité ou sur une norme de compétence.
  • L’article 36 doit être modifié pour que l’OCENA relève directement du Parlement et non pas du ministre.
  • ARCH adopte les recommandations de l’AODA Alliance quant aux mesures à prendre pour renforcer la représentation des personnes handicapées à l’OCENA[3]
  • L’article 39 doit être modifié pour que le commissaire à l’accessibilité relève du Parlement et non du ministre.  Cela donnerait au commissaire une plus grande autonomie. 

6. Le projet de loi C-81 ne doit pas permettre aux organisations d’être soustraites de l’application de la conformité aux exigences d’accessibilité :

Le projet de loi permet aux entités réglementées d’être exemptées de la conformité aux exigences d’accessibilité.  Or, rien en principe ne justifie que certaines organisations soient soustraites à cette obligation.  Toute exemption affaiblira l’objet général de la Loi.

  • Les paragraphes 46(1), 55(1), 64(1) et 68(1) doivent être supprimés du projet de loi.  Ils autorisent le ministre, le CRTC ou l’OTC à soustraire des entités de l’obligation de se conformer aux exigences d’élaboration et de publication des plans sur l’accessibilité, de création des processus de rétroaction et de production de rapports d’étape.
  • L’alinéa 117(1)(l) doit être supprimé. Il autorise le gouvernement à exempter certaines organisations ou ouvrages de l’obligation de produire et de publier des plans sur l’accessibilité, de créer des processus de rétroaction et de produire des rapports d’étape.
  • Le paragraphe 117(2) doit être modifié pour exiger que le gouvernement justifie toute création d’une catégorie d’entités, précise si cette catégorie va ou non être soustraite à une exigence d’accessibilité, en informe la population, offre une possibilité de rétroaction et examine cette rétroaction avant de créer ladite catégorie. Si une catégorie d’entités est soustraite à l’application d’une exigence d’accessibilité, cette exigence devra être réexaminée afin d’en déterminer l’éventuel bien-fondé. 

7. Le projet de loi C-81 ne doit pas atténuer les garanties juridiques actuelles des personnes handicapées:

  • Le projet de loi C-81 devra préciser dans son préambule et dans son objet qu’il n’atténue en rien les obligations actuelles des entités relevant de la compétence fédérale vis-à-vis des droits humains garantis par la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne.  En cas de différend, la loi assurant la plus vaste accessibilité aux personnes en situation de handicap s’appliquera.
  • L’article 117 doit stipuler que rien dans les règlements ne doit atténuer ou minimiser le droit à la non-discrimination garanti par la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
  • Le projet de loi C-81 doit être modifié pour que l’Office des transports du Canada (OTC) soit tenu d’appliquer le même critère légal sur la discrimination que la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne et le Tribunal afférent.  L’application de ce critère s’impose car, en vertu du projet de loi C-81 et conformément à la Loi sur les transports au Canada, l’OTC deviendra le principal forum de règlement des plaintes sur l’accessibilité des transports.  Sans cette modification, de nombreuses plaintes sur l’accessibilité des transports risquent de ne pas être accueillies par l’OTC ou ne bénéficieront pas des avantages d’une rigoureuse analyse juridique réalisée selon l’optique des droits de la personne[4].
  • Le projet de loi C-81 doit être modifié afin de stipuler que la conformité aux règlements prescrits en vertu de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, n’implique pas automatiquement l’absence de tout « obstacle excessif » ou discriminatoire.   Sans cette modification, les organismes de transports ayant respecté les normes d’accessibilité ne seront pas tenus de respecter leurs obligations juridiques au titre de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. [5].

8. Le projet de loi C-81 doit s’attaquer aux obstacles dus à la pauvreté et à la discrimination intersectorielle (croisée):   

Le projet de loi doit être plus percutant pour pouvoir s’attaquer aux nombreux obstacles et aux obstacles intersectionnels érigés pour des motifs identitaires ou subis par les personnes handicapées à faible revenu ou vivant dans la pauvreté. 

  • L’article 6 doit être modifié pour enchâsser les principes suivants :
    • L’incidence de la pauvreté est disproportionnée chez les personnes handicapées.
    • Les obstacles uniques et intersectionnels auxquels sont confrontés les femmes et les filles en situation de handicap doivent être reconnus et traités.
    • Les personnes handicapées sont diverses et sont confrontées à des obstacles multiples et intersectoriels,  suite à la discrimination pour motifs de déficience ou de multiples déficiences,  de race, de nationalité, d’origine ethnique, de couleur, de religion, de sexe, d’orientation sexuelle, de genre ou d’expression, de statut familial, de caractéristiques génétiques et/ou de condamnation pour laquelle un pardon a été accordé ou pour laquelle une suspension du casier judiciaire n’a été révoquée.  Les obstacles multiples et intersectoriels doivent être reconnus et traités.  
    • L’identification, l’élimination et la prévention des obstacles doivent être exécutées conformément aux principes de conception et d’accessibilité universelles.
    • Conformément à l’article 12 de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, les personnes handicapées jouissent de la capacité juridique, sur la base de l’égalité avec les autres.
  • La Partie 4 doit inclure une disposition supplémentaire stipulant que les plans sur l’accessibilité se rattacheront à l’objet de la Loi et seront produits puis mis en vigueur conformément à ses principes.  Les plans devront préciser comment ils contribueront à la création d’un Canada exempt d’obstacles, dans les délais prescrits par la Loi.  Ces modifications renforceront l’efficacité des plans sur l’accessibilité et permettront d’intégrer le traitement des questions d’intersectionnalité et de pauvreté dans l’identification, la prévention et l’élimination des obstacles.
  • De même, l’article 117 devra être modifié pour exiger que les règlements fassent progresser l’objet de la loi et ses principes.
  • La Partie 6 doit prévoir que le commissaire à l’accessibilité bénéficiera d’une formation en compétences anti-racistes, anti-oppression et culturelles, afin que le processus de traitement des plaintes ne perpétue pas la discrimination systémique subie par les personnes handicapées ethno-raciales et les Autochtones en situation de handicap.
  • La Partie 6 doit être modifiée pour instaurer un programme d’aide financière qui permettrait de s’attaquer aux obstacles entravant l’accès à la justice des personnes handicapées à faible revenu ou vivant dans la pauvreté.
  • La terminologie de la conception et de la prestation des programmes et services doit être utilisée à la Partie 5.  Cette modification s’impose pour éviter les problèmes prévisibles que susciterait l’instauration des paramètres ou objectifs principaux dégagée de toute considération des questions de déficience, d’accessibilité et d’inclusion.  L’accessibilité et l’inclusion ne doivent pas être prises en compte après coup. 
  • ARCH adopte la recommandation d’ALFA préconisant le remplacement du mot Canadiens par l’expression « personnes au Canada.[6] ».  Ce changement s’impose pour que tous les résidents du Canada bénéficient des exigences d’accessibilité au titre de la Loi et ce, quel que soit leur statut de citoyen ou leur indentification au Canada.

9. ARCH appuie la recommandation d’ALFA, de l’Association des Sourds au Canada et d’autres organisations de personnes handicapées, selon laquelle le projet de loi C-81 devrait reconnaître l’ASL et la LSQ comme langues officielle des personnes Sourdes au Canada. 

10. Le projet de loi C-81devrait s’attaquer aux obstacles auxquels sont confrontés les Autochtones handicapés et les personnes des Premières Nations en situation de handicap:  

Le gouvernement du Canada doit travailler avec les collectivités autochtones et des Premières Nations afin d’identifier les modifications requises pour que le projet de loi s’attaque aux obstacles subis dans ces communautés.

11. Tout comme ALFA, ARCH reconnait qu’il est indispensable d’identifier, éliminer et prévenir les obstacles en communications.  Le projet de loi doit donc préciser que les communications seront traitées dans chacun des secteurs cernés à l’article 5, en complémentarité avec les actuelles obligations juridiques visant à accommoder les personnes en situation de handicap.

12. Le projet de loi C-81 doit inclure de plus fermes dispositions pour réviser la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité et assurer un suivi à l’application de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées:

  • L’article 131 doit être modifié pour que le comité soit tenu d’effectuer un examen cinq ans après la date de promulgation de la Loi.  Cette modification préviendra tout délai de l’examen si les règlements ne sont pas rapidement mis en vigueur. 
  • L’article 132 doit être modifié pour que le premier examen indépendent de la Loi ait lieu en 2015 et tous les quatre ans par la suite.  Il coïncidera avec le dépôt du rapport du bilan du Canada, au titre de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées (CDPH).
  • L’article 149 doit prévoir la participation significative des personnes handicapées au suivi de l’application de la CDPH.  Une telle participation est d’ailleurs obligatoire en vertu du paragraphe 33(3) de la Convention.   L’article 149 doit être modifié pour que ce suivi soit effectué par la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne, conformément aux articles 33(2) et 33(3) de la CDPH. La Commission et les collectivités de personnes handicapées devront bénéficier des ressources requises à cette fin.

13. Le projet de loi C-81 doit inclure de plus solides définitions du handicap et des obstacles :

  • L’article 2 doit être modifié par l’ajout au début de la définition du handicap, de « le handicap inclut mais sans s’y limiter » et par l’ajout « que la déficience soit ou non évidente ».  De telles modifications élargiront la définition du handicap et la rendront plus inclusive.  These changes would make the definition of disability broader and more inclusive.
  • L’article 2 doit être modifié par l’ajout du mot « loi » à la définition d’obstacle.  Cela garantira l’identification, l’élimination et la prévention des obstacles créés par les lois fédérales. 

14. Le projet de loi Bill C-81 doit exiger que le ministre mette en œuvre une transformation graduelle du Canada en un pays sans obstacles:

Les articles 11(2) à 16 doivent être modifiés afin d’ajouter des attributions au ministre responsable de la Loi afin  qu’il puisse mettre en œuvre une transformation graduelle du Canada en un pays sans obstacles.  Ces fonctions supplémentaires incluront:

  • le ministre établira des points repères pour réaliser la transformation progressive du Canada en un pays sans obstacles;
  • le ministre établira des échéanciers graduels l’atteinte de ces points repères;
  • le ministre évaluera régulièrement les progrès réalisés par rapport aux points repères.  À cet égard, l’article 15 devra être modifié pour se lire: «  Sous réserve de la Loi sur la statistique, le ministre  recueillera, analysera, interprétera, publiera et diffusera des renseignements concernant les questions d’accessibilité. » Un autre paragraphe  devra être ajouté pour que le ministre soit tenu de recueillir, analyser, interpréter, publier et diffuser les données relatives aux progrès réalisés par rapport aux point de repères établis et dans les délais prescrits par la Loi.

15. Le projet de loi C-81 doit garantir l’équité de la procédure de soumission des plaintes au commissaire à l’accessibilité:

  • Le paragraphe 95(e) doit être modifié afin de préciser que le délai de prescription d’un an pour le dépôt des plaintes débute dès que le plaignant a constaté la perte subie à cause de la Loi ou d’une omission.  Cette modification garantira que nul ne sera privé de la possibilité de déposer une plainte d’accessibilité pour ne pas avoir constaté que la non-conformité de l’organisme aux dispositions de la Loi était survenue plus d’un an auparavant. 
  • L’article 103 doit être modifié pour la personne examinant une décision de ne pas enquêter sur une plainte ou de mettre fin à l’enquête ne soit pas celle ayant  pris la décision initiale. 
  • La Partie 6 doit inclure un paragraphe autorisant les plaignants qui sollicitent un examen des décisions du commissaire à l’accessibilité à présenter leur demande dans selon un processus et dans une forme accessibles.

[1] Pour une analyse juridique et des pratiques plus détaillée, se référer aux pages 37 et 38, 41 et 42 et 47 du rapport final de ARCH, disponible à http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report (en anglais)

[2] Pour une analyse  juridique et des pratiques plus détaillée, se référer aux pages 37 et 38, 41 et 42 et 47 du rapport final de ARCH, disponible à http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report (en anglais)

[3] Parmi les recommandations de l’AODA Alliance notons :

L’article 32 doit être modifié pour accorder une indemnisation et des dépenses raisonnables aux membres des comités consultatifs de l’OCENA et plus particulièrement aux membres de la collectivité des personnes handicapées ou des secteurs bénévoles ou à but non lucratif.

Le paragraphe 32(1) du projet de loi doit être modifié pour que le PDG de l’OCENA puisse consulte rle Conseil de l’organisation de normalisation lors de la sélection des membres d’un comité consultatif chargé d’aider l’organisation à élaborer des normes d’accessibilité.

La Partie 2 du projet de loi doit être modifiée pour :

Exiger que l’OCENA consulte la population, y compris les personnes en situation de handicap, dans les délais prescrits, sur les normes d’accessibilité qu’elle devrait élaborer.

Exiger que l’OCENA publie, dans les délais prescrits et réguliers, les normes d’accessibilité qu’elle a décidé de commencer à élaborer et les travaux en cours à cet égard.

Exiger que l’OCENA publie les procès-verbaux de ses comités consultatifs ainsi que ceux de son Conseil, qui devraient être conservés.  Les recommandations préliminaires en cours d’examen devront être identifiées dans ces procès-verbaux pour permettre à la population de connaître exactement les  travaux de l’OCENA.

Exiger que l’OCENA consulte la population, y compris la collectivité des personnes handicapées, sur le contenu des normes d’accessibilité qu’elle envisage adopter.

Pour plus de détails, consulter le mémoire sur le projet de loi C-81 soumis par l’AODA Alliance au Parlement, le 27 septembre 2018, disponible à l’adresse : : https://www.aodaalliance.org/whats-new/please-tell-the-federal-government-if-you-support-the-aoda-alliances-finalized-brief-to-the-parliament-of-canada-that-requests-amendments-to-bill-c-81-the-proposed-accessible-canada-act/

[4] Pour une analyse des pratiques et  juridique plus détaillée, se référer aux pages 41 et 42, 47, 57 à 62 du rapport final de ARCH, disponible à http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report (en anglais)

[5] Pour une analyse des pratiques et  juridique plus détaillée, se référer aux pages 41 et 42, 47, 57 à 62 du rapport final de ARCH, disponible à http://archdisabilitylaw.ca/Legal_Analysis_of_Accessible_Canada_Act_Final_Report (en anglais)

[6] Pour de plus amples détails, se référer aux recommandations de l’Alliance pour une loi fédérale sur l’accessibilité visant à améliorer le projet de loi C-81, la Loi proposée sur l’accessibilité au Canada; octobre 2018. 


ARCH Recommendations on Bill C-81 / Recommandations pour Modifications au Projet de Loi C-81 (16-10-18)



Last Modified: August 1, 2019

Sign Up for ARCH Updates

Don't have an email address?
ARCH News
Updates on ARCH activities and events.
ARCH Blog
Posts that explore topics on disability law, legal practice, and anything in between.
ARCH Alert
Quarterly newsletter with news and information on disability issues and updates on ARCH work.